Crossroads and a New Direction

Sometimes we come to a crossroads in our lives where we have to make a choice and/or change direction. For the last little while, those of you who follow my blog might have noticed a sharp decrease in the number of posts and overall level of activity. There are a lot of reasons for this, but the foremost reason is that I have been steadily coming to that Crossroad in my life personally as well as creatively.

crossroads

I am a writer, and I am a Christian. The latter isn’t something I broadcast with a bullhorn, as I’ve always felt more comfortable just living and doing my best to show who I am by actions rather than words. Words not backed by actions are empty anyway; I guess I figure why waste precious breath?

I’ve been online for years, participating in various groups and interacting with numerous people, and one thing has struck me: there are a lot of Christians Creatives like me (artists, writers, actors, musicians) floating around cyberspace. I can really only speak to the writing world since I know it best, but I’m thrilled to see the variety and innovation of what these Creatives have produced. I was never a fan of the ‘western’ Christian romance novels that were all the rage (and standard) throughout my teen years, for example, and I craved the imagination-stirring visions offered in my favorite secular science fiction and fantasy novels. Over time, quality offerings in these genres became more common in Christian bookstores (yes!). However, when compared to Bibles and devotionals, fiction, and more specifically, speculative fiction, remain but a small portion of what is consumed in the marketplace.

So where am I going with this?

I want to do my part to change this. I know how hard I’ve worked over the last few years to learn my trade and to improve my craft, and I know I’m not the only one who wishes to make more of an impact with my creations. Also, despite all the contacts and connections I’ve made, I’ve never really found ‘my place’–I often feel caught between the secular and Christian worlds. I figure I can’t be the only one. So, I’ve been turning over a bunch of ideas of how to better support Christian Creatives (and not just authors) and I have some thoughts, including the start of a new blog and other services for that purpose. But I’d also like to hear from other Christian Creatives out there: What do you think would be helpful in order to improve exposure, support, community building, etc?

For those who are wondering, this blog will remain but it will continue to be writing-oriented and independent of my new endeavor. 🙂

Thanks for reading! If you have comments, drop me a line below. Have a great week!

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Nor’easter by Dyane Forde

It’s here! My story, Nor’easter, short-listed for the Storgy writing contest is published!

NOR’EASTER

by

Dyane Forde

typewriter love

North

“Wake up.”

I opened my eyes against the morning glare but immediately shrunk back from a headache. White and black stars pulsed before my eyes; those two words, “Wake up”, a hammer pulverising the side of my face. Wind blew in from the open window, admitting a mean downdraft which pressed me into the bed. I knew, from the smell of rot trailing in on the draft, how this scene was going to end: a storm was coming, and that storm was me.

The voice. It was Dale’s. Uncle Dale, my blood. My savior. I shook my head to let the information slide into place, but my brain rebelled. It crackled with pain, interference. Tenderly, I put a hand to my forehead, as if that would steady the tumult inside, and felt relief. My face, my skin, my head were whole. Only, I wasn’t. Skin…

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Repost: Mistakes to Avoid in Short Story Writing

Looking for some professional tips on how to prepare your short story for submission? This is a great article by Anne Leigh Parrish, fiction editor for Eclectica Magazine, who shares concrete, easy to understand tips and suggestions on the subject. A must read!

http://thewoventalepress.net/2015/03/15/mistakes-to-avoid-in-short-story-writing/#comment-667

Looking for something new? Try a Flash Fiction Contest

I won! After the posting of my last article that included the flash fiction piece The Task, I was invited to enter a WOW555, flash fiction contest hosted by author, ghostwriter, and editor Wendy Strain on her blog writeonwendy. It was a tight battle, but thanks to a tie break, the story won. How cool!

Are you looking for a place to practice flash fiction? Give it a go! Visit the site to see the other great entries for last week’s event, and try your hand at this week’s. It’s a lot of fun, the participants are warm and welcoming, and you’ve the chance to bang out some writing at the same time. 🙂

WOW 555 Writing Challenge Winner’s BadgeSee you there! 

 

Never Say Never, or You Just Might Find Yourself Writing Longhand–Shiver!

Rarely will you hear me say I will never do something. Why? Because you never know when those words will come back to bite you in your plump, writer’s behind. What follows is just such an example. 

I haven’t written a story by hand in ages. Once I got my word processor (years ago!) and, later, my own computer followed by my laptop, I left the archaic days of paper and pen behind, and happily. Back then, I hated that my wrist got sore, and that weird callous on my middle finger was a source of pride (Yay! I’m a writer!), but also annoyance (Ugh, how to ruin a good-looking pair of hands!). Besides, it was slow. My mind would be three sentences ahead before my hand would catch up, which always resulted in chicken scratch even I couldn’t figure out when it came to revising or transcribing to the computer. Good riddance and no looking back!  Futurama Yes, the computer was a godsend. Quick, easy, and waste-free, it was a breeze to write and edit, and it required no transcribing—another thing I hated about writing longhand. 

But, well…you see, I’ve…um…(coughs)– I’ve gone back to longhand writing. There. I said it.

In an older post, I hinted at it, as I find writing poetry by hand helpful in getting me ‘unstuck’—maybe it’s the fact I’m creating in an environment different from the one I’m stuck in (bent over paper with a pen in hand versus hunched over a keyboard staring at a blank screen), or perhaps, as it has been suggested, that handwriting uses a different part of the brain than typing. Regardless, I have found it successful. For poetry. 

So, how is it that I’m finding myself writing a story by hand?  I’ve mentioned that I have tendonitis in my ‘mouse’ hand/elbow, and, lately, I’ve been bothered by back and neck problems on the other side. I write for work and then I go home and write for play. To deal with this, I decided to ease up on writing and focus on other things instead: reading, editing, beta reading etc, to still be in the writing head space while resting my body.

But I’m still driven to create.  So, here I am, back at the beginning, holding a pen in one hand and bracing a lined page with the other, just like I did in the first grade when I wrote my first story. And I have to say, I’m liking it. 😉 

From chronicle.com

From chronicle.com

Some thoughts:

  • I’ve discovered that the brain is pretty remarkable, and this exercise made me realize just how fast it can be. As I’m getting my words on paper, I’m conscious of just how many decisions I am making before the pen hits the page: Is this the right word? No? Okay, should I change it? To what? Or should I just keep going and correct it later? …How does this section relate to what’s coming? Do I even know what’s coming? No? Who cares? Stop thinking, don’t self-editing, just write, write, write, get it down and correct later. Write, write, write! Try it. It’s pretty amazing.
  • Going slow isn’t bad. I like to be productive. I don’t have a lot of spare time, so the fact that a computer lets me bang out a story quickly and in one shot is very satisfying. However, this process is changing the way I approach my writing sessions: being forced to write in short bursts before my hand wears out forces me to think first about what I want to get down on paper. And between sessions, I think about what should happen next, rather than typing whatever feels right at the moment because I’m on a roll or because I just want to have something finished by the end of the session. It’s a different way of writing for me, and though it’s hard to slow down, I find this process pretty neat.

Anyhoo, those are my thoughts on this. What do you think? Do you write by hand or were you like me, spurning it with every ounce in your body? I’d love to hear your thoughts. Oh, and I’d share a little of the story I am working on, but well, it’s on paper. 😉 Maybe next time!