Reblog: Let’s Talk about Rejections

Please click on the heading below to read the post:

An Open Letter to Editors & Agents: It’s Time to Talk About Rejections

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the submission-rejection process. Have you been treated to the ‘no response’ response or the super-vague “you’re just not right for us” rejection letter? Do you think these suggestions might be helpful? Share your thoughts below!

 

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Repost: One Writer/Proofreader’s File Backup Protocol

To Back Up or not Back Up. Are you protecting your work?

It seems so basic and obvious a question that we don’t talk much about it nowadays. But backing up our work is important. W. Bryan Miller, author, proofreader, and programmer, gives us his take on the idea.

How do you back up your files? Have you ever lost an important doc? Please share! 

Click here for the article.

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Finally. Revision Help for the Hopeless Writer

Revising is one of the most difficult aspects of writing for many writers. The reasons vary from not having a good beta-reader or critique network, to lack of editing skills or lack of confidence in our own editing skills, lack of money to pay someone to do the job for us, etc. Like many of you, I’ve experienced those issues at various stages of my writing career. Not only do those problems cause stress, but they can delay the completion of a manuscript or result in the production of an inferior one.

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My published books in the Rise of the Papilion Trilogy took many years to complete, largely for the reasons mentioned above. At the completion of each book, the sense of accomplishment and joy I felt were immediately followed by terror:  What the heck do I do now, and how in the world can I afford it???

Recently, I’ve been attending various free webinars on subjects like book marketing and tools to facilitate the book writing process. Last night, I attended one on the basics of good revision called, The 3 Levels of Fiction Revision & Why You Must Know Them, hosted by Laura Backes and Jon Bard.

The content was great. Simple, concise, informative and also a good refresher. I learned to write not by attending creative writing courses or workshops by doing the work and learning from my mistakes. The lack of formal training has always been a source of anxiety for me, as it leads to constant second-guessing and a disorganized method of writing and revision. The webinar was helpful in putting a framework on what revision actually is and the essentials for doing it right.

But, then there was the introduction of a new revision tool they created called, Manuscript Magic. It’s only been out a few months, and it’s the first time I’ve heard of it. But it is an online program that takes revision to a new level for someone like me who learned on the go and is still learning on the go.

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The program breaks the revision process down from revising a chapter at a time to revising a scene at a time, which is more manageable and less daunting. There are teaching videos which elaborate on writing concepts, as well as checklists that point out specific aspects of your story to consider while offering change options. Ultimately, it seems to be a practical writer’s guide to editing and revision, or maybe better, a tool that teaches how to shift from Writer Mode to Editor Mode, and to do it with confidence.

So, I bought the membership. It wasn’t cheap but I’ve paid more than that for simple proofreads, forget about a full manuscript edit. And, that’s saying a lot because I NEVER buy the programs or tools or packages offered at the end of webinars. But this program interested me because it’s a once-time purchase not a monthly subscription and, if it works 1) it would drastically improve my manuscripts in less time that it normally takes and with less frustration, 2) could reduce the amounts I would normally spend on editing by presenting the editor/proof-reader with a cleaner manuscript 3) I can learn to become a better writer and reviser 4) it could help me improve and complete the other WIPs wallowing on the backburner these last few years. In other word, I might be able to write better, complete projects faster, and ultimately publish better books.

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I plan to start with the first book I wrote, The Eagle’s Gift. It was a passion project that got ruined after too many crits from the review site I joined resulted in a jumbled mess. At the time, I was too inexperienced and in love with the book to handle all the feedback. The story never recovered, but I am hopeful this program can help me identify the problems and fix them.

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So, is my gamble worth it? Can the program deliver? I joined up last night and all the promised bonuses (dedicated Facebook support, free advice and counsel from well-known editing professionals active in the business) for signing up right away were available. The Facebook group is small but active and people are posting about their positive experiences. So, good start. I’ll keep you all posted and let you know how it all works out.

Tips For Writing Your Author Bio

Need help writing your author bio? Check out the post Writing Your Book Proposal Bio on The Steve Laube Agency website for tips.

Enjoy!

Review Exchange

 

https://stevelaube.com/writing-your-book-proposal-bio/

 

Repost: Writing for the Modern Reader — PWR Lounge

By Megan Alms, a professional writing student at Taylor University. You have about 10 seconds. Ten seconds to convince your reader that what you have to say is important. In the twenty-first century, readers don’t have the patience or attention span to labor over your words. These 10 methods will help make your writing clear […]

Some great advice! Check out the link for more.

via Writing for the Modern Reader — PWR Lounge